Ubiquiti RocketM to Cisco Router

Cisco Router -> RocketM (AP-WDS Mode) this will setup a transparent bridge to allow the Cisco to do the DHCP.

Ubiquiti Point-to-Multipoint (PtMP)

Point-to-Multipoint (PtMP) links are used routinely to serve up to 100 locations from a single Access Point (thanks to Ubiquiti’s airMax technology).

 

There are many approaches to providing PtMP services.  This example is the simplest, using a single Ubiquiti radio with an omnidirectional antenna to create a bridged network.  Even a simple IP addressing schema is included!

 

Clearly, a more complex approach is often desired; one that uses multiple Ubiquiti radios with sector antennas along with a fully routed (rather than bridged) configuration. That however, is not this article.  Most new users will benefit by starting with this simplified approach to become familiar with PtMP or to serve a smaller, limited area.

 

Wiki BeansTalk 55x Simple ISP AP.png

 

FIRST: Install a router as shown above. Configure it as a DHCP server with an IP pool that is large enough to serve the number of customer devices (e.g. – computers, printers, etc.) you need to serve. NOTE: The pool should not extend lower than 192.168.1.21. The instructions for doing this are different for each router manufacturer. Please consult their FAQ for assistance if needed.

 

Configuration and Setup

 

Accessing the Radio:

  1. Restore your radio to FACTORY DEFAULT values. This is critical, especially if you are troubleshooting a problem.  To perform a reset, press-and-hold the [Reset] button, power-on, release the [Reset] button when the lights begin to flash.
  2. Connect the radio to your computer using an Ethernet cable. The Ethernet port is auto-sensing. You are not required to use a cross-over cable.
  3. Using a web browser, enter 192.168.1.20 as the “URL” to gain access to the radio’s management console.
  4. Enter “ubnt” as the administration account and “ubnt” as the password.

Configure the radio labeled as 192.168.1.2 (the Access Point):

A. Choose the |Wireless| tab and change only the following values:

  • Wireless Mode: Access Point
  • WDS: [X] Enable
  • Press the [Change] button

B. Choose the |Network| tab and change only the following values:

  • IP Address: 192.168.1.2
  • Press the [Change] button
  • Press the [Apply] button

DONE with this radio (the AP), proceed to Customer Radios after repeating steps 1-4 above with them
Configure the radios labeled as 192.168.1.3 through .102 (the Customer Radios) above:

C. Choose the |Wireless| tab and change only the following values:

  • Wireless Mode: Station
  • WDS: [X] Enable
  • Press the [Change] button

D. Choose the |Network| tab and change only the following values:

  • IP Address: 192.168.1.3 (increment by x.x.x.+1 for each additional Customer Radio … skipping 192.168.1.20)
  • Press the [Change] button
  • Press the [Apply] button
  • repeat the steps in this section for all Customer Radios

DONE
If using a Cable/DSL Modem:

E. Reboot or power cycle the Cable/DSL modem off and on before using this link.

ALL DONE

 

Radio Installation errata:

  • Install all outdoor radios using Ubiquiti ToughCable Pro (for routine installations) or ToughCable Carrier (when co-locating with a high-power VHF or UHF transmitter).
  • If the Access Point will be co-located with high-power VHF transmitters, use Ubiquiti ToughCable Carrier cable
  • Use UBNT’s supplied Power over Ethernet (PoE) adapters and plug them into properly grounded AC outlets

Configuring Customer Computing Equipment:

  • The router / DHCP server will serve configuration information to all connected computers. Configure computer equipment for “Automatic” configuration.

 


NOTES:

1 – Secure your installation – modify the default administration account

  • Select |System| tab > System Accounts
  • Administrative Username [change it from ‘ubnt’]
  • Hover over icon to the right, “Change Password” and change it
  • Press [Change] button, press [Apply] button

2 – Secure your wireless network from unauthorized use by others

  • Select |Wireless| Tab > Wireless Security
  • Security > WEP (this is the ONLY encryption available in this mode)
  • Preshared Key: [enter something long, but memorable to you]
  • Press [Change] button. Press [Apply] button.

Alternate Customer Premises Equipment

SOHO WiFi Router

Wiki BeansTalk-55x_WiFi_SOHO_Router.pngRather than terminate in a single device or computer, you may wish to provide your customers with a SOHO WiFi Router. Using a Ubiquiti device is advantageous because it allows you to manage the full network all the way into the home or business. It also provides an additional layer of security because you can isolate a customer from your wireless backhaul network very easily.

 

The isolation is a result of configuring your AP Router (the Gateway) to a different subnet (change from using 192.168.1.1 to use 192.168.2.1 instead) and then associating the SOHO routers WAN port on it, then having the SOHO router serve IP addresses to LAN customer devices within the 192.168.0.x subnet. This configuration makes the 192.168.1.x subnet invisible to customer devices!

 

The diagram to the right shows this variation graphically. The table below describes the simplest IP plan that will work. Instructions below that describe how to configure a Ubiquiti SOHO Router as described.

Begin by configuring your AP Router (Gateway) interface to 192.168.2.1. Because each router is different, please refer to your router manufacturers FAQ for assistance.
Bottom-loaded IP Plan in alignment with graphic

AP Router IP Access Point IP CPE Radio IP SOHO Router IP
192.168.1.1 192.168.1.2 192.168.1.3 192.168.1.103
192.168.1.4 192.168.1.104
192.168.1.5 192.168.1.105
192.168.1.6 192.168.1.106
192.168.1.7 192.168.1.107
192.168.1.8 192.168.1.109
192.168.1.9 192.168.1.109
192.168.1.10 192.168.1.110
192.168.1.11 192.168.1.111
192.168.1.12 192.168.1.112
192.168.1.13 192.168.1.113
192.168.1.14 192.168.1.114
192.168.1.15 192.168.1.115
192.168.1.16 192.168.1.116
192.168.1.17 192.168.1.117
192.168.1.18 192.168.1.118
192.168.1.19 192.168.1.119
SKIP / OMIT x.x.x.20/.120
192.168.1.21 192.168.1.121
192.168.1.22 192.168.1.122
192.168.1.23 192.168.1.123
192.168.1.24 192.168.1.124
through through
192.168.1.102 192.168.1.202

Configure the Ubiquiti SOHO Wi-Fi Routers:

Assuming you begin with the units at FACTORY DEFAULT, proceed . . .

 

F. Choose the |Wireless| tab and change only the following values:

  • Wireless Mode: Access Point
  • SSID: (something easy for the customer to recognize such as: last name, phone number, address, etc)
  • Channel Width: 20 MHz
  • Wireless Security > Security: WPA (some older computers may not work with WPA2)
  • Wireless Security > WPA Authentication: AES
  • Wireless Security > WPA Preshared Key: (something known and relevant to the customer)
  • Press the [Change] button

G. Choose the |Network| tab and change only the following values:

  • Network Mode: SOHO Router
  • WAN IP Address: 192.168.2.2 (linking it to the AP Router interface, which should be set to 192.168.2.1)
  • IP Gateway: 192.168.2.1
  • Primary DNS IP: 8.8.8.8 (a public server, choose your favorite if not this one)
  • Secondary DNS IP: 4.2.2.1 (a public server, choose your favorite if not this one)
  • LAN Network Settings > IP Address: 192.168.0.1
  • LAN Network Settings > Netmask: 255.255.255.0
  • LAN Network Settings > [X] Enable NAT
  • LAN Network Settings > Range Start: 192.168.0.2
  • LAN Network Settings > Range End: 192.168.0.99
  • LAN Network Settings > Netmask: 255.255.255.0
  • Press the [Change] button

H. Choose the |System| tab and change only the following values:

  • Device name: (something memorable to YOU; Customer Name, etc.)
  • Time Zone: GMT (Western European Time)
  • Administrator User Name: change it to your standard; do NOT leave it at factory default
  • Hover over spyglass icon to the right of Administrator User Name: change password to your standard; do NOT leave it at factory default
  • Press the [Change] button
  • Press the [Apply] button
  • repeat the steps in this section for all Customer SOHO Routers

Bandwidth Requirements for HD Video Streaming

If there isn’t a dedicated internet connection available, streaming can be achieved over 3G/4G, WiFi, or a shared network; however, delivery using these methods increases the likelihood of a failure and is not recommended.

System Center 2012 Overview

Configuration Manager lets you deploy software to employee’s devices and computers, inventory their hardware, push out OS / software updates as well as deploy OSs to bare metal computers. New in Configuration Manager 2012 is user centric management of devices and software with the concept of a user’s primary device(s), self-service software catalog, management of mobile devices, a vastly simplified infrastructure hierarchy, remediation of configuration drift through settings management and Role Based Access.

Virtual Machine Manager manages your fabric infrastructure for virtualization: hosts, clusters and networks from the bare metal to the ultimate abstraction in private clouds. The 2012 version has changed fundamentally from its predecessor in the overall scope by now managing the entire fabric, creating Hyper-V clusters from bare metal, managing resource and power optimization natively, interfacing with Hyper-V, VMWare ESX and Citrix Xen server hosts and orchestrating patching of clusters. There’s also a Service model that lets you deploy (and subsequently update) entire groups of related VMs for a distributed application, there’s Server App-V application virtualization deployment, built in High Availability for Virtual Machine Manager itself, storage control (iSCSI and FC SANs) and built in self-service with Role Based Access control.

Operations Manager keeps an eye on your servers (physical and virtual), OS (Windows and Unix / Linux), applications (All Microsoft, many, many third party and Java application servers) and your networks through Microsoft and third party Management Packs that contain knowledge about each component. New in 2012 is a simpler infrastructure with built in High Availability, much better and easier network monitoring, enhanced dashboards that can be published to SharePoint for wider audiences, Application Performance Monitoring (formerly known as Avicode), Java Enterprise Edition (JEE) monitoring and enhanced functionality and security for *nix monitoring.

Data Protection Manager is the best backup product for Microsoft’s workloads, following supported processes to backup from Disk to Disk, Disk to Tape, Disk to Disk to Tape as well as Disk to Disk to Cloud. New in 2012 is a centralized console (through Operations Manager) that can manage hundreds of Data Protection Manager servers (including DPM 2010), a new console UI, scoped consoles for troubleshooting, Role Based Access, improved Item Level Recovery (ILR) for recovering files from within VMs that have only been backed up through a host level backup, much faster SharePoint recoveries and certificate based communication for workgroup data sources.

Orchestrator (formerly known as Opalis) is a newcomer in the Service Center 2012 suite but it’s very important as it integrates and links the other components through automation. Via a Visio like interface Activities are linked together into Runbooks that can then automate IT processes on demand; Runbooks can be started from a web interface or from Service Manager or any other product that talks to the new Orchestrator Web Service. The true power of Orchestrator comes in the form of Integration Packs that allows it to “talk” to many other systems, including all the components in System Center 2012 as well as earlier System Center versions and many other third party systems, giving you a true automation engine to better provide IT as a service.

Source: http://4sysops.com/archives/system-center-2012-overview-of-components/

New MOSI Rack

Full Rack on top of MOSI Roof!
20130408-210929.jpg

Duplexer Notes

TX on High Side

RX on Low Side

Station Class Codes (Full List)

Station Class Codes
Code↓ Description ↓
AOX Operational Fixed
APC ALASKA PUBLIC
APX ALASKA PRIVATE
APX2 ALASKA PRIVATE (TEMPORARY)
AX AERONAUTICAL FIXED
AX1 AERONAUTICAL FIXED (MOBILE)
AX2 AERONAUTICAL FIXED (TEMPORARY)
DGP DIFFERENTIAL GPS
ELT ELT TEST
ELT1 ELT TEST (MOBILE)
FA AERONAUTICAL ENROUTE
FA1 AERONAUTICAL ENROUTE (MOBILE)
FA2 AERONAUTICAL ENROUTE (TEMPORARY)
FAA AERONAUTICAL ADVISORY (UNICOM)
FAA1 AERONAUTICAL ADVISORY (UNICOM) (MOBILE)
FAA2 AERONAUTICAL ADVISORY (UNICOM) (TEMPORARY)
FAB AUTOMATIC WEATHER OBSERVATION
FAC AIRPORT CONTROL TOWER
FAS AVIATION SUPPORT INSTRUCTIONAL
FAS1 AVIATION SUPPORT INSTRUCTIONAL (MOBILE)
FAT FLIGHT TEST
FAT1 FLIGHT TEST (MOBILE)
FAT3 FLIGHT TEST (ITINERANT)
FB Base
FB2 Mobile Relay
FB2A Mobile Relay – Airport Terminal Use
FB2C Mobile Relay – Interconnect
FB2I Mobile Relay – Itinerant
FB2J Mobile Relay – Temporary Interconnect
FB2K Mobile Relay – Stand-by Interconnect
FB2L Mobile Relay – Itinerant Interconnect
FB2S Mobile Relay – Stand-by
FB2T Mobile Relay – Temporary
FB4 Community Repeater
FB4A Community Repeater – Airport Terminal Use
FB4C Community Repeater – Interconnect
FB4I Community Repeater – Itinerant
FB4J Community Repeater – Temporary Interconnect
FB4K Community Repeater – Stand-by Interconnect
FB4L Community Repeater – Itinerant Interconnect
FB4S Community Repeater – Stand-by
FB4T Community Repeater – Temporary
FB6 Private Carrier (profit)
FB6A Private Carrier (profit) – Airport Terminal Use
FB6C Private Carrier (profit) – Interconnect
FB6I Private Carrier (profit) – Itinerant
FB6J Private Carrier (profit) – Temporary Interconn
FB6K Private Carrier (profit) – Stand-by Interconne
FB6L Private Carrier (profit) – Itinerant Interconn
FB6S Private Carrier (profit) – Stand-by
FB6T Private Carrier (profit) – Temporary
FB7 Private Carrier (non-profit)
FB7A Private Carrier (non-profit) – Airport Terminal Use
FB7C Private Carrier (non-profit) – Interconnect
FB7I Private Carrier (non-profit) – Itinerant
FB7J Private Carrier (non-profit) – Temporary Inter
FB7K Private Carrier (non-profit) – Stand-by Interc
FB7L Private Carrier (non-profit) – Itinerant Inter
FB7S Private Carrier (non-profit) – Stand-by
FB7T Private Carrier (non-profit) – Temporary
FB8 Centralized Trunk Relay
FB8A Centralized Trunk Relay – Airport Terminal Use
FB8C Centralized Trunk Relay – Interconnect
FB8I Centralized Trunk Relay – Itinerant
FB8J Centralized Trunk Relay – Temporary Interconnect
FB8K Centralized Trunk Relay – Standby Interconnect
FB8L Centralized Trunk Relay – Itinerant Interconnect
FB8S Centralized Trunk Relay – Standby
FB8T Centralized Trunk Relay – Temporary
FBA Base – Airport Terminal Use
FBAT Small Base – Temporary
FBBS Base
FBC Base – Interconnect
FBCT FBCT
FBGS Ground
FBI Base – Itinerant
FBJ Base – Temporary Interconnect
FBK Base – Stand-by Interconnect
FBL Base – Itinerant Interconnect
FBS Base – Stand-by
FBSI Air-ground Signaling
FBST Standby
FBT Base – Temporary
FC PUBLIC COAST
FC2 PUBLIC COAST(TEMPORARY)
FCA MARINE SUPPORT-TESTING & TRAINING
FCA2 MARINE SUPPORT-TESTING & TRAINING (TEMPORARY)
FCL PRIVATE COAST
FCL2 PRIVATE COAST (TEMPORARY)
FCU MARINE UTILITY
FCU1 MARINE UTILITY (MOBILE)
FIS Flight Information Services
FIS1 Flight Information Services with Hand Held/Mobile
FIS2 Flight Information Services for Temporary Operatio
FLT Auxilary Test
FLTC Auxiliary Test – Interconnect
FLTI Auxilary Test – Itinerant
FLTL Auxilary Test – Itinerant Interconnect
FLU AVIATION SUPPORT SERVICE
FLU1 AVIATION SUPPORT SERVICE (MOBILE)
FMA1 AIRCRAFT FLIGHT TEST STATION
FX Fixed
FX1 Control
FX1A Control – Airport Terminal Use
FX1C Control – Interconnect
FX1I Control – Itinerant
FX1J Control – Temporary Interconnect
FX1K Control – Stand-by Interconnect
FX1L Control – Itinerant Interconnect
FX1S Control – Stand-by
FX1T Control – Temporary
FX2 Fixed Relay
FX2A Fixed Relay – Airport Terminal Use
FX2C Fixed Relay – Interconnect
FX2I Fixed Relay – Itinerant
FX2J Fixed Relay – Temporary Interconnect
FX2K Fixed Relay – Stand-by Interconnect
FX2L Fixed Relay – Itinerant Interconnect
FX2S Fixed Relay – Stand-by
FX2T Fixed Relay – Temporary
FX3 Secondary Fixed (Tone Signalling)
FX3A Secondary Fixed – Airport Terminal Use
FX3C Secondary Fixed – Interconnect
FX3I Secondary Fixed – Itinerant
FX3J Secondary Fixed – Temporary Interconnect
FX3K Secondary Fixed – Stand-by Interconnect
FX3L Secondary Fixed – Itinerant Interconnect
FX3S Secondary Fixed – Stand-by
FX3T Secondary Fixed – Temporary
FX5 Temporary Fixed
FXA Fixed – Airport Terminal Use
FXB Primary Permanent Fixed Stations or Links
FXC Fixed – Interconnect
FXCO Central Office
FXCT Control
FXDI Dispatch
FXI Fixed – Itinerant
FXIO Inter-office
FXJ Fixed – Temporary Interconnect
FXK Fixed – Stand-by Interconnect
FXL Fixed – Itinerant Interconnect
FXO Operational Fixed
FXOA Fixed – Interconnect – Airport Terminal Use
FXOC Operational Fixed – Interconnect
FXOI Operational Fixed – Itinerant
FXOJ Operational Fixed – Temporary Interconnect
FXOK Operational Fixed – Stand-by Interconnect
FXOL Operational Fixed – Itinerant Interconnect
FXOS Operational Fixed – Stand-by
FXOT Operational Fixed – Temporary
FXRP Repeater
FXRX Fixed Relay
FXS Fixed – Stand-by
FXSB Fixed Subscriber
FXT Fixed – Temporary
FXTS Auxiliary Test
FXV CTS Exceeding 20′
FXW CTS Meeting 20′
FXY Interzone
FXYC Interzone – Interconnect
FXZ Zone
FXZC Zone – Interconnect
GCO GROUND COMMUNICATIONS OUTLET
LR Radiolocation Land
LRC Radiolocation Land – Interconnect
LRJ Radiolocation Land – Temporary Interconnect
LRK Radiolocation Land – Stand-by Interconnect
LRS Radiolocation Land – Stand-by
LRT Radiolocation Land – Temporary
MFL AERONAUTICAL MULTICOM
MFL1 AERONAUTICAL MULTICOM (MOBILE)
MFL2 AERONAUTICAL MULTICOM (TEMPORARY)
MFX MARINE OPS FIXED
MFX2 MARINE OPS FIXED (TEMPORARY)
MLSB Mobile Subscriber
MO Mobile
MO3 Vehicular Repeater
MO3A Vehicular Repeater – Airport Terminal Use
MO3C Vehicular Repeater with Interconnect
MO3I Vehicular Repeater – Itinerant
MO3J Vehicular Repeater with Temporary Interconnect
MO3K Vehicular Repeater with Stand-by Interconnect
MO3L Vehicular Repeater with Itinerant Interconnect
MO3S Stand-by Vehicular Repeater
MO3T Temporary Vehicular Repeater
MO5 Mobile & Temporary Fixed
MO6 Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit)
MO6A Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) – Airport Terminal Use
MO6C Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) – Interconnect
MO6I Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) – Itinerant
MO6J Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) with Temporary Interconnect
MO6K Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) with Stand-by Interconnect
MO6L Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) with Itinerant Interconnect
MO6S Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit) – Stand-by
MO6T Temporary Private Carrier Mobile Operation (profit)
MO7 Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit)
MO7A Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) – Airport Terminal Use
MO7C Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) – Interconnect
MO7I Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) – Itinerant
MO7J Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) with Temporary Interconnect
MO7K Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) with Stand-by Interconnect
MO7L Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) with Itinerant Interconnect
MO7S Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit) – Stand-by
MO7T Temporary Private Carrier Mobile Operation (non-profit)
MO8 Centralized Trunk Mobile
MO8A Centralized Trunk Mobile – Airport Terminal Use
MO8C Centralized Trunk Mobile – Interconnect
MOA Mobile – Airport Terminal Use
MOC Mobile – Interconnect
MOI Mobile – Itinerant
MOJ Mobile with Temporary Interconnect
MOK Mobile with Stand-by Interconnect
MOL Mobile with Itinerant Interconnect
MOS Mobile – Stand-by
MOT Mobile – Temporary
MOU1 AERONAUTICAL UTILITY MOBILE
MR Radiolocation Mobile
MRT MARINE RECEIVER TEST
MRT2 MARINE RECEIVER TEST (TEMPORARY)
MSC SHORE RADAR TEST
MSC2 SHORE RADAR TEST (TEMPORARY)
MSR SHORE RADIONAVIGATION
MSR2 SHORE RADIONAVIGATION (TEMPORARY)
RCO REMOTE COMMUNICATIONS OUTLET
RLA AERONAUTICAL MARKER BEACON
RLA1 AERONAUTICAL MARKER BEACON (MOBILE)
RLA2 AERONAUTICAL MARKER BEACON (TEMPORARY)
RLB AERONAUTICAL RADIO BEACON
RLB1 AERONAUTICAL RADIO BEACON (MOBILE)
RLB2 AERONAUTICAL RADIO BEACON (TEMPORARY)
RLC SHORE RADIOLOCATION TEST
RLC2 SHORE RADIOLOCATION TEST (TEMPORARY)
RLD RADAR/RADAR TEST
RLD1 RADAR/RADAR TEST (MOBILE)
RLD2 RADAR/RADAR TEST (TEMPORARY)
RLG GLIDE PATH (SLOPE)
RLG1 GLIDE PATH (SLOPE) (MOBILE)
RLG2 GLIDE PATH (SLOPE) (TEMPORARY)
RLL LOCALIZER
RLL1 LOCALIZER (MOBILE)
RLL2 LOCALIZER (TEMPORARY)
RLO OMNIDIRECTIONAL RADIO RANGE
RLO1 OMNIDIRECTIONAL RADIO RANGE (MOBILE)
RLO2 OMNIDIRECTIONAL RADIO RANGE (TEMPORARY)
RLR SHORE RADIOLOCATION/RACON
RLR2 SHORE RADIOLOCATION/RACON (TEMPORARY)
RLT RADIONAVIGATION LAND TEST
RLT1 RADIONAVIGATION LAND TEST (MOBILE)
RLT2 Radionavigation Land Test – Temporary
RNV RADIONAVIGATION LAND
RNV1 RADIONAVIGATION LAND (MOBILE)
RNV2 RADIONAVIGATION LAND (TEMPORARY)
RPC RAMP CONTROL
SAR SEARCH AND RESCUE
SAR1 SEARCH AND RESCUE (MOBILE)
UAT Universal Access Transceiver service – Fixed
UAT1 Universal Access Transceiver service – Mobile
UAT2 Universal Access Transceiver service – Temporary Fixed
WDX Radiolocation Weather Radar
WDXS Radiolocation Weather Radar – Standby
WDXT Radiolocation Weather Radar – Temporary

 

FCC Station Class Codes

Station class codes describe the purpose for which a particlular station is used. The most common ones are:

  • FB – Base Station – A station at a specified site authorized to communicate with mobile stations.
  • MO – Mobile Station – A station in the mobile service intended to be used while in motion or during halts at unspecified points. This includes hand carried transmitters and, with certain limitations, may also include boats and aircraft.
  • FX1 – Control Station – A base station that operates through a repeater in the same way as a mobile station.
  • FXO – Operational Fixed Station – A transceiver which may operate as a link between two or more fixed locations. The designator is often used in radio link or SCADA telemetry systems.
  • FB4 – Community Repeater – A conventional repeater which is usually stand-alone (no connection to other sites or repeaters) and operates multiple CTCSS or CDCSS tones, or possibly a single-frequency LTR repeater which accommodates multiple subscribers. These subscribers need to be licensed individually to use their respective tone, code, or LTR talkgroup.
  • FB6 – Private Carrier (profit) – A repeater operated by a radio communications provider for multiple subscribers who are covered under the carrier’s license.
  • FB7 – Private Carrier (non-profit) – A repeater operated by a not-for-profit entity for multiple subscribers who are covered under the entity’s license.
  • FB8 – Centralized Trunk Relay – A repeater operating within a centralized trunked radio system which has exclusive use of the designated frequency within a given geographic area. The designation is used between 150 – 512 MHz and may indicate a variety of technologies including analog, P25, 2-slot DMR (MOTOTRBO), NXDN, or other centralized trunking scheme. The use of FB8 on T-Band is seen, but is redundant, as T-Band systems which meet channel loading criteria already have geographic exclusivity. A T-Band trunked system should rather use FB2 instead, with trunking operation indicated as a YW in the Radio Service field.
  • MO8 – Trunked Subscriber Unit – A mobile or hand-held transceiver operating in a centralized trunked radio system within an exclusive geographic area. This designation is used between 150 – 512 MHz to indicate that the frequency corresponds to an exclusive trunked system.

Commonly Observed Emission Designators

Commonly Observed Emission Designators (Full List)

60H0J2B PSK31
100HN0N Speed Radar (10525 MHz X band; 24150 MHz Ka band)
150HA1A Continuous Wave Telegraphy (manually read Morse Code)
2K80J2B HF RTTY (Radio Teletype)
2K80J2D HF PACTOR-III
2K80J3E HF Single sideband suppressed carrier voice (USB or LSB, not at the same time)
3K00H2B HF ALE MIL-STD-188-141A/FED-STD-1045
3K30F1D 6.25 kHz SCADA link (CalAmp Viper SC – 173 MHz)
4K00F1D 6.25 kHz data NXDN (Narrow IDAS, NEXEDGE)
4K00F1E 6.25 kHz voice NXDN (Narrow IDAS, NEXEDGE)
4K00F1W 6.25 kHz voice and data NXDN (Narrow IDAS, NEXEDGE)
4K00F2D 6.25 kHz analog CW ID NXDN (Narrow IDAS, NEXEDGE)
4K00J1D Amplitude Compandored Sideband (pilot tone/carrier)
4K00J2D Amplitude Compandored Sideband (pilot tone/carrier)
4K00J3E Amplitude Compandored Sideband (pilot tone/carrier) voice
5K60F2D SCADA
5K76G1E P25 Phase I CQPSK voice (typically used for simulcast systems – this is NOT P25 Phase II)
6K00A3E Double sideband AM voice
6K00F1D SCADA Carrier Frequency Shift Keying
6K00F2D SCADA Audio Frequency Shift Keying
6K00F3D SCADA Analog data that is not AFSK (variable tone, DTMF, etc.)
7K30F1D Futurecom “MOBEXCOM” DVRS (mobile repeater) data (P25 waveform, slightly narrower occupied bandwidth)
7K30F1E Futurecom “MOBEXCOM” DVRS (mobile repeater) voice (P25 waveform, slightly narrower occupied bandwidth)
7K60FXD 2-slot DMR (Motorola MOTOTRBO) TDMA data
7K60FXE 2-slot DMR (Motorola MOTOTRBO) TDMA voice
8K10F1D P25 Phase I C4FM data
8K10F1E P25 Phase I C4FM voice (typically used for single-site systems)
8K10F1W P25 Phase II subscriber units (Harmonized Continuous Phase Modulation – H-CPM)
8K30F1D 112.5 kHz data NXDN (Wide IDAS, NEXEDGE)
8K30F1E 12.5 kHz voice NXDN (Wide IDAS, NEXEDGE)
8K30F1W P25 Phase I C4FM hybridized voice and data applications (most commonly seen on trunked licenses)
8K30F7W 12.5 kHz voice and data NXDN (Wide IDAS, NEXEDGE)
8K50F9W Harris OpenSky (2 slot narrowband)
8K70D1W P25 Linear Simulcast Modulation ASTRO (9.6 kbps in 12.5 kHz channelspace)
9K20F1D Zetron-based alphanumeric paging/alerting system (seen in practice using Daniels base stations)
9K30F1D SCADA/ EOD Robot Remote Control
9K80D7W P25 Phase II fixed-end 2-slot TDMA (Harmonized Differential Quadrature Phase Shift Keyed modulation – H-DQPSK), per Motorola literature
9K70F1D P25 Linear Simulcast Modulation “WCQPSK” data (per Harris MASTR-V literature)
9K70F1E P25 Linear Simulcast Modulation “WCQPSK” voice (per Harris MASTR-V literature)
9K80F1D P25 Phase II fixed-end 2-slot TDMA H-DQPSK data, per Harris MASTR-V literature
9K80F1E P25 Phase II fixed-end 2-slot TDMA H-DQPSK voice (interpolation of MASTR-V literature)
10K0F1D LTI Automated Vehicle Location (AVL) system – LT6 Radio Modem
10K0F1D Motorola 3600 baud trunked control channel on narrowband channel
10K0F1D RD-LAP 9.6 kbps data on narowband channel
10K0F1D Motorola Widepulse ASTRO simulcast data
10K0F1D Motorola Widepulse ASTRO simulcast control channel
10K0F1E Motorola Widepulse ASTRO simulcast voice
11K2F2D Audio frequency shift keying within a 12.5 kHz channelspace (commonly used for 1.2 kbps packet, FFSK station alerting, and AFSK tornado siren signaling)
11K2F3D DTMF or other audible, non-frequency shift signaling, such as Whelen tornado sirens or “Knox-Box®” activation
11K2F3E 2.5 kHz deviation FM “narrowband 12.5 kHz” analog voice, 11.25 kHz occupied bandwidth (11K0 and 11K3 prefixes are effectively considered the same as 11K2); 30 – 50 MHz licensees DO NOT need to convert to this.
11K2F9W Formerly and incorrectly used as a catch-all narrowband emission for analog and digital use. Each appropriate emission should be listed discretely.
12K1F9W Harris OpenSky (NPSPAC – 4 slot)
13K1F9W Harris OpenSky (SMR – 4 slot)
13K6W7W Motorola iDEN (900 MHz)
14K0F1D Motorola 3600 baud trunked control channel (NPSPAC)
16K0F1D Motorola 3600 baud trunked control channel
16K0F1D RD-LAP 9.6 kbps NPSPAC
16K0F2D 4 kHz deviation FM audio frequency shift keying (72 MHz fire alarm boxes)
16K0F3E 4 kHz deviation FM analog voice (NPSPAC)
16K8F1E Encrypted Quantized Voice (Motorola DVP, DES, DES-XL on NPSPAC)
17K7D7D Motorola HPD High Performance Data – “Astro 25” suite, as Motorola HAI (High performance data Air Interface) – 700/800 MHz – requires 25 kHz channelspace
20K0D1W Reduced power TETRA – PowerTrunk 4/TDMA fixed-end (simultaneous mixed modes)
20K0D1E Reduced power TETRA – PowerTrunk 4/TDMA fixed-end (voice)
20K1D1D Reduced power TETRA – PowerTrunk 4/TDMA fixed-end (data)
20K0F1D RD-LAP 19.2 kbps within a wideband channel (2013 compliant, meets data throughput requirement)
20K0F1E Encrypted Quantized Voice (Motorola DVP, DES, DES-XL – NOT P25 DES-OFB/AES)
20K0F3E 5 kHz deviation FM “wideband 25 kHz” analog voice – Continues to be authorized for 30 – 50 MHz systems after 1 Jan 2013
20K0G7W Motorola iDEN (800 MHz)
20K0W7W Motorola iDEN (800 MHz)
21K0D1W TETRA ETS 300 392 Standard
30K0DXW TDMA Cellular (North America)
40K0F8W AMPS Cellular
300KF8E Broadcast FM with Subsidiary Carrier (SCA)
300KGXW GSM Cellular
300KG7W EDGE (Enhanced Data rates for GSM Evolution)
1M25F9W CDMA Cellular
2M40W7D Remote Control Video (digital, non-NTSC)
5M00G7D Public Safety LTE (all four emissions used)
5M00W7W Public Safety LTE (all four emissions used)
5M00G2D Public Safety LTE (all four emissions used)
5M00D7D Public Safety LTE (all four emissions used)
6M00C7W ATSC Video (Digital TV)
6M25C3F NTSC Video (excluding sound)

* Revised 11/29/2012

Florida Hams Prove that Ham Radio Works When Cell Phones Don’t

Florida Hams Prove that Ham Radio Works When Cell Phones Don’t

03/06/2013
After a day of exploring the Green Swamp Wildlife Management Area — which covers 50,692 protected acres in Florida’s Lake, Polk and Sumter Counties — with his grandson, Joe Cody, KE4WDP, of Winter Haven, Florida, saw that the roads were flooding and becoming hazardous. As he tried to drive out of the area, Cody’s small pick-up truck got bogged down in the mud. Since he was out of cell phone range, Cody tried calling for help on the Dade City 146.880 repeater. Richard Parker, KF4ORW, of Dade City, Florida, heard the call and answered.
After hearing the situation, Parker called 911 in Pasco County, who put him in touch with the dispatch in neighboring Polk County. Cody passed his location on to Parker, who in turn passed it on to the Polk County Sherriff’s Office. “Polk County 911 took over trying to get help,” Parker said. “They called me back several times for more information and I was able to relay information from Joe to them. Then Ted Bulmanski, W4TKB, who is also from Dade City, started monitoring and copying Joe’s information.”
About 30 minutes later, Parker saw a helicopter fly over and around Cody’s position, and after another 30 minutes, Cody radioed back on the repeater, saying he was on his way home — thanks to a Lake County Deputy in a Sherriff’s Office truck that had a winch. “We learned that Joe was eight miles inside Lake County,” Parker explained. “That’s why the Lake County Sherriff’s Office responded instead of the Polk County authorities. The Polk County Sherriff’s Office called me back to say that the helicopter from Lake County found the truck inside Lake County and sent both a deputy from Lake County, as well as a Fish and Game Officer and winched him out of the mud. They called me back to thank us for assisting the stranded pair. Ham radio still works when other forms of communications don’t.” — Thanks to ARRL West Central Florida Section Public Information Coordinator Kevin Poorman, KV4CT, for the information